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Well we all heard what an awesome outcome Miranda had at Sufferfest Triathlon last weekend coming 4th over the line and 1st female for the sprintfest. What a fantastic race, Congratulations Miranda!

Our Interview this week was a bit of a ‘quickie’ due to both of our work and training commitments, so thanks Miranda for stepping up, again.

SB: Miranda, what are your personal strengths that you bring into this sport?

MC: Possibly my positive attitude, my willingness to give just about anything a go, and if I’m not doing it, I’m cheering you on. Oh and maybe my big cheesy grin, always happy to share that one.


SB: Do you feel you react to ‘the pack’? Or is this all about a time trial against yourself?

MC: I have received some pretty good advice about the importance of ‘racing your own race’, so this is what I try to do. I had started getting caught up in comparing myself with others. Doing this was creating extra stress, anxiousness about my performance and possibly took a bit of the fun out of what I was doing.

So the plan these days is to focus on what I’m doing to reach my goals. However… I’m running or riding my bike, and you’re in front of me? Know that I’m chasing you – (glad I’m not in your age group! haha)


SB: Is it a conscious decision for you to ‘win’ or ‘try your best’?

MC: Realistically, it’s a rarity for me to win. I’ve worked that one out. My swim needs so much more work & my age group is quite strong. Unless all that changes, guess I’m a ‘always try my best’ triathlete. I set personal goals for both races and also with my training. Could be either reaching a certain time up a hill, or nailing a tough interval run session.


SB: What leg/s are your strongest?

MC: The Run & Ride equally strong I’d say. Swim is still catching up. This may take a while, and that’s ok.


SB: Is there 1 particular leg that you have improved on significantly over the others?

MC: Possibly my ride has improved mostly due to regular rides which I’ve been doing for the past year. These include hills and flats. Always helps if you’re trying to keep up with stronger riders.

My run has also improved greatly over the last year too. I put this down to including interval sets at least once a week. Make them varied & get them done with purpose.


SB: Do you train outdoors regardless of weather conditions? Or do you mix it up? If so, what is your mindset when doing long training sessions indoors?

MC: Basically all my training is done outdoors. Before or at sunrise, or at days’ end with a sunset. Even cold wet winter days I’d rather be outside. I’m yet to join a gym, but was thinking I may do this winter.


SB: What is your strongest memory of your 1st half Ironman?

MC: Murray Man 2016, I had challenged myself to do a 70.3 distance when I was still a fairly newbie triathlete. Strongest memories were, why aren’t my legs working now I am I meant to run? Other memory would be where’s the ice-cream & pool in the recovery area? Priorities!! (Mary Mitchell, you would relate to this one wouldn’t you!)


SB: What was your goal leading into this sport?

MC: I’ve always just been about getting outdoors, having fun & taking some nice pictures along the way. There were no goals set coming into this sport, my mindset was just a let’s see what happens. Definitely got hooked after the first few sessions.


SB: What is the advantage in this sport in being a female?

MC: I can’t see that there is an advantage, other than maybe only the windbreak & draft you get from the guys you are riding with, on a windy day!


SB: What is the disadvantage in this sport in being a female?

MC: I tend not to compare between genders. We’re all built differently, so we’re are all going to have different strengths & weaknesses. (Great answer Miranda!)


SB: Best race ever?

MC: I have 2. (over achiever J)
Ballarat 70.3, 2016, which was my first run into Ironman red carpet. That one has to be up there. The other one would be Cairns 70.3, 2017, such a beautiful place to race. Again I got to finish on the red carpet, and the bonus was to watch & cheer on my mates finish their full Ironman.


SB: Worst race ever?

MC: That Gatti tinman in my first season when I went home and cried. Felt despair at my swim. Although it felt like my worst, it was a real turning point with my swim. From then on I sucked it up, got on with it & didn’t allow nerves get the better of me.

Just because we could get in a few extras…


SB: What might we never know/guess about you?

MC: Popped my left knee ACL when I was 21. Never had it fixed, I’m still able to do everything without it. Never put limits on what I can try, or do. Other than that, I tend to read the paper, and magazines, back to front. All the interesting stuff is at the back.


SB: When have you been ‘star struck’?

MC: I’m still in awe of what my training mates have done, and continue to do. This won’t stop.


SB: Do you carry a lucky charm/have a special mantra?

MC: Run with odd socks, or no socks at all.


Text by Susanê Belkhiati | Image supplied by Miranda McInnes/Crawley

Published by Tony Brady

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